"The Corporate Basilisk"

cramulus:

At some point in the future, the Company will hire a new manager. He will then fire everybody who did not help him get hired.

To ensure your continued employment, you should really advocate for this hypothetical person to be hired NOW, even though he hasn’t applied yet, and might not ever exist.

i thought roko’s executive was a mimetic hazard!

Reblogged from Cramulus
kinesthetiac:

METAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA

kinesthetiac:

METAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA

Reblogged from Squash Tea
theacheofmodernism:

GUYS I CAN’T STOP LAUGHING

theacheofmodernism:

GUYS I CAN’T STOP LAUGHING

Reblogged from w e r e w o l f
As the Secretary General of the United Nations, an organization of 147 member states who represent almost all of the human inhabitants of the planet Earth, I send greetings on behalf of the people of our planet. We step out of our solar system into the universe seeking only peace and friendship, to teach if we are called upon, to be taught if we are fortunate. We know full well that our planet and all its inhabitants are but a small part of the immense universes that surrounds us and it is with humility and hope that we take this step.

The story of Carl Sagan’s Golden Record, humanity’s eternal message to the cosmos 

Reblogged from crooked indifference
pwwt:

this is very frightening to me but very good

pwwt:

this is very frightening to me but very good

Reblogged from pwwt

Anonymous said: You really don't have mental imagery? You're missing out.

hot-gay-rationalist:

dataandphilosophy:

Probably.

I have very little visual imagery tbh, even non-mental.

Like, I’m not blind, but things I look at aren’t really properly recorded unless I make an active effort, and even then I just remember it in broad strokes. It’s very hard to remember faces, and people in my mind are mostly just grey labelled blobs. I never even try visualising scenes described by books.

Brains are so weird.

feelin this

This is big in the Grinder community. Most people start off by implanting magnets in their fingertips, which gives you the ability to feel magnetic fields. Your fingertips have lots of nerve endings jammed into one area and they are really sensitive to stimuli. Magnets twitch or move in the presence of magnetic fields, and when you implant one in your finger you can really start to feel different magnetic fields around you. So it is like a sixth sense. At first you will be waving your hand around appliances, probing fields like someone looking for a light switch in the dark. After a few days or weeks you will almost forget you have the implant because your brain has fully incorporated the sense into your normal world experience. When you sleep you will notice that even your dreams have changed to include the sense. You can now perceive an otherwise invisible world.

This makes many curious about all of the other things happening around them that they can’t see and they want more. So let’s expand on the magnet thing. We can buy all kinds of different sensors to detect heat, radiation, radio signals, wifi, whatever you want. If we wrap a wire around our implanted finger and attach that wire to our new sensor, we find that the wire creates a small magnetic field to the beat of the sensor. This of course makes our magnet twitch, and now we can feel heat from a distance, feel wifi, or whatever.

Why limit ourselves to feeling these sensations? We have other senses we can induce synesthesia in. I got some media attention in June of 2013 after I implanted headphones in my tragus to do just that. I had some practical reasons for doing this in addition to my thirst for exploration. A few years earlier I suddenly became legally blind in one eye. Lenses cannot correct it and my original eye doctor informed me that the other eye was likely to follow, at which point I would be legally blind, lose my job, etc. With this inevitability in mind I decided to be proactive. Ultrasonic rangefinders are devices used to determine how far away an object is. I knew that most blind people find acoustic variations help them identify the proximity of objects, so I figured I might be able to amplify this by converting rangefinder data into audio I could send wirelessly to my headphone implants. It turned out to be much more complicated than I thought, but that is a part of Grinding that I have come to appreciate. My setbacks lead me deeper into the rabbit hole of audiology where I discovered knowledge that has unlocked a thousand more possibilities.

I’d say that 25% of the people I talk to about sensory enhancement think it’s really cool and some go get implants themselves. The other 75% will nod their head and hope the conversation ends or they laugh and ask “why would anyone want to feel magnetic fields?” I get asked that question so much, and I still find it hard to articulate. They usually point out that “you don’t need it,” to which I counter “what if you lost the ability to taste? You don’t really need it to survive.” Ask anyone with an implant how they would feel if they lost the implant, and almost all of them will tell you they would miss it. A small bit of richness would be missing from their life experience.

Visible light is but a tiny portion of the greater magnetic spectrum that we cannot see. If we modeled the entire spectrum as a road stretching from LA to New York, the amount of visible light that humans can see would equal a few nanometers. Humans, from our allegorical caves, have nonetheless managed to form and test theories about things at the edges of perception but these discoveries took thousands of years. Where would humans be now technologically if we never developed sight? How long would it take us to theorize the existence of the aurora borealis or to hypothesize about the existence of stars? This reduction of input obviously cripples the rate of input.

So is the opposite true? Would expanding our senses accelerate our advancement? My answer is yes. Some Grinder friends of mine formed a team called Science for the Masses to discover if they could biologically push human perception of visible light into the near-infrared spectrum. This is a small increase, around 6% above our current abilities. The impact is dramatic. The new light allows you to see through fog and haze, tinted windows, and some clothing. Stars can be seen during day hours. Subtle changes in blood flow can be seen under the skin, allowing anyone to detect circulation problems and find clots. Seeing blood flow takes some of the guesswork out of determining what mood your date is in and lying becomes nearly impossible. Imagine how this awareness would have altered human history, politics, art, courtship, and relationships. Does human psychology benefit in a world where sincerity and emotional context can be seen with the naked eye rather than hypothesized or conjured? The new layers of info I’ve detailed above are actually just the tip of the iceberg. The real magic of sensory expansion comes from finding deviations and surprises that don’t fit within our scientific understanding because it makes us reconcile our mental models of the world with reality.

— Zoltan Istvan interviews Rich Lee
http://ieet.org/index.php/IEET/more/istvan20140708
Reblogged from 2020
feelings are not instructions.
— the wise and magnificent lola pellegrino
Reblogged from words for friends

I’ve just glanced over the D&D 5e Core Rules as released today.

Good to see they’ve taken some giant steps back from the precipice of doom that 4e represented for Wizards of the Coast. Good to see spells operating as spells rather than Pokémon moves. Too bad they’ve arrived at a slightly simplified version of 3.5e rather than something that would make me consider switching over from Pathfinder, but at least WotC correctly reacted to what an unmitigated disaster 4e was for their profit margins, to say nothing of the art of tabletop at large.

victoriousvocabulary:

SUBAUDITION
[noun]
1. an act or instance of understanding or mentally supplying something not expressed.
2. something mentally supplied; understood or implied meaning.
Etymology: from Latin subauditio, “the supplying of a word omitted”, from subaudire, “to supply a word omitted”, from sub, “under” + audire, “to hear”.
[Tomasz Alen Kopera]

victoriousvocabulary:

SUBAUDITION

[noun]

1. an act or instance of understanding or mentally supplying something not expressed.

2. something mentally supplied; understood or implied meaning.

Etymology: from Latin subauditio, “the supplying of a word omitted”, from subaudire, “to supply a word omitted”, from sub, “under” + audire, “to hear”.

[Tomasz Alen Kopera]

Reblogged from The Summer of Mark

beshitted:

anagrammaton:

knuckle tats say FOUC AULT

knuck tats saying POST, and on the other hand, having transcended the limitations of the form, STRUCTURALIST

Reblogged from ceci n'est pas un blog
I hate and I love. Perhaps you ask why I do this.
I know not, but I feel that it is happening, and am tormented greatly.
— Catullus