malicedesire:

This is my boyfriend of 6 years, dilutedlife. He was diagnosed with cardiomyopathy at the age of 25 (He is 31 now). When he was first diagnosed he was in the hospital for a while. At the time he didn’t have insurance and he is still paying off his medical bill debt from then. Recently, he had to go to the emergency room twice in one month. The second time he was admitted to the hospital for heart failure. His cardiologist wants him to have surgery to get a pacemaker and defibrillator installed. His surgery is scheduled for the 25th of September. Since he has insurance through his employer he will have to pay a large deductible. I’m asking anyone who can help to donate to his GoFundMe campaign and share it on as many social media sites as possible.
I love him with all my heart and would gladly give him my own if I could. He is my linchpin. He helps me endure my mental illness while dealing with his own physical and mental health. Because of him I have become a better human being. His kindness isn’t just limited to me but, to everyone he meets. He does his best to do what he can to make the world a better place through everything he does, whether those actions are big or small.

This is my boyfriend’s cousin’s long-term boyfriend. Signal boost. If any of you guys are looking for a way to make a difference, here’s your chance.

malicedesire:

This is my boyfriend of 6 years, dilutedlife. He was diagnosed with cardiomyopathy at the age of 25 (He is 31 now). When he was first diagnosed he was in the hospital for a while. At the time he didn’t have insurance and he is still paying off his medical bill debt from then. 

Recently, he had to go to the emergency room twice in one month. The second time he was admitted to the hospital for heart failure. His cardiologist wants him to have surgery to get a pacemaker and defibrillator installed. His surgery is scheduled for the 25th of September. Since he has insurance through his employer he will have to pay a large deductible. 

I’m asking anyone who can help to donate to his GoFundMe campaign and share it on as many social media sites as possible.

I love him with all my heart and would gladly give him my own if I could. He is my linchpin. He helps me endure my mental illness while dealing with his own physical and mental health. Because of him I have become a better human being. His kindness isn’t just limited to me but, to everyone he meets. He does his best to do what he can to make the world a better place through everything he does, whether those actions are big or small.

This is my boyfriend’s cousin’s long-term boyfriend. Signal boost. If any of you guys are looking for a way to make a difference, here’s your chance.

Reblogged from MaliceDesire
Reblogged from Captain Zlog
surrealism:


Un peu malade le cheval patte pelu… (A little sick horse’s leg) by Max Ernst, 1920. Collage and gouache on paper, 16 x 23 cm. Galleria Civica d’Arte Moderna e Contemporanea, Turin, Italy.

surrealism:

Un peu malade le cheval patte pelu… (A little sick horse’s leg) by Max Ernst, 1920. Collage and gouache on paper, 16 x 23 cm. Galleria Civica d’Arte Moderna e Contemporanea, Turin, Italy.

Reblogged from one surrealist a day

pizzaback:

wolves-whales-and-waves:

griseus:

The marine eels and other members of the superorder  Elopomorpha have a leptocephalus larval stage, which are flat and transparent. This group is quite diverse, containing 801 species in 24 orders, 24 families and 156 genera (super diverse). 

Leptocephali have compressed bodies that contain jelly-like substances on the inside, with a thin layer of muscle with visible myomeres on the outside, a simple tube as a gut, dorsal and anal fins, but they lack pelvic fins. They also don’t have any red blood cells (most likely is respiration by passive diffusion), which they only begin produce when the change into the juvenile glass eel stage. Appears to feed on marine snow, tiny free-floating particles in the ocean.

This large size leptocephalus must be a species of Muraenidae (moray eels), and probably the larva of a long thin ribbon eel, which is metamorphosing, and is entering shallow water to finish metamorphosis into a young eel, in Bali, Indonesia.

Is it just me or does he look REALLY excited about where ever (s)he’s going?

BBY EEL

Reblogged from Lunch Bag Art
neurosciencestuff:

Nerve impulses can collide and continue unaffected
According to the traditional theory of nerves, two nerve impulses sent from opposite ends of a nerve annihilate when they collide. New research from the Niels Bohr Institute now shows that two colliding nerve impulses simply pass through each other and continue unaffected. This supports the theory that nerves function as sound pulses. The results are published in the scientific journal Physical Review X.
Nerve signals control the communication between the billions of cells in an organism and enable them to work together in neural networks. But how do nerve signals work?
Old model
In 1952, Hodgkin and Huxley introduced a model in which nerve signals were described as an electric current along the nerve produced by the flow of ions. The mechanism is produced by layers of electrically charged particles (ions of sodium and potassium) on either side of the nerve membrane that change places when stimulated. This change in charge creates an electric current.
This model has enjoyed general acceptance. For more than 60 years, all medical and biology textbooks have said that nerves function is due to an electric current along the nerve pathway. However, this model cannot explain a number of phenomena that are known about nerve function.
New model
Researchers at the Niels Bohr Institute at the University of Copenhagen have now conducted experiments that raise doubts about this well-established model of electrical impulses along the nerve pathway.
“According to the theory of this ion mechanism, the electrical signal leaves an inactive region in its wake, and the nerve can only support new signals after a short recovery period of inactivity. Therefore, two electrical impulses sent from opposite ends of the nerve should be stopped after colliding and running into these inactive regions,” explains Thomas Heimburg, Professor and head of the Membrane Biophysics Group at the Niels Bohr Institute at the University of Copenhagen.
Thomas Heimburg and his research group conducted experiment in the laboratory using nerves from earthworms and lobsters. The nerves were removed and used in an experiment which allowed the researchers to stimulate the nerve fibres with electrodes on both ends. Then they measured the signals en route. 
“Our study showed that the signals passed through each other completely unhindered and unaltered. That’s how sound waves work. A sound wave doesn’t stop when it meets another sound wave. Both waves continue on unimpeded. The nerve impulse can therefore be explained by the fact that the pulse is a mechanical wave in the form of a sound pulse, a soliton, that moves along the nerve membrane,” explains Thomas Heimburg.
The theory is confirmed
When the sound pulse moves through the nerve pathway, the membrane changes locally from a liquid to a more solid form. The membrane is compressed slightly, and this change leads to an electrical pulse as a consequence of the piezoelectric effect.
“The electrical signal is thus not based on an electric current but is caused by a mechanical force,” points out Thomas Heimburg.
Thomas Heimburg, along with Professor Andrew Jackson, first proposed the theory that nerves function by sound pulses in 2005. Their research has since provided support for this theory, and the new experiments offer additional confirmation for the theory that nerve signals are sound pulses.

Huh! Awesome!

neurosciencestuff:

Nerve impulses can collide and continue unaffected

According to the traditional theory of nerves, two nerve impulses sent from opposite ends of a nerve annihilate when they collide. New research from the Niels Bohr Institute now shows that two colliding nerve impulses simply pass through each other and continue unaffected. This supports the theory that nerves function as sound pulses. The results are published in the scientific journal Physical Review X.

Nerve signals control the communication between the billions of cells in an organism and enable them to work together in neural networks. But how do nerve signals work?

Old model

In 1952, Hodgkin and Huxley introduced a model in which nerve signals were described as an electric current along the nerve produced by the flow of ions. The mechanism is produced by layers of electrically charged particles (ions of sodium and potassium) on either side of the nerve membrane that change places when stimulated. This change in charge creates an electric current.

This model has enjoyed general acceptance. For more than 60 years, all medical and biology textbooks have said that nerves function is due to an electric current along the nerve pathway. However, this model cannot explain a number of phenomena that are known about nerve function.

New model

Researchers at the Niels Bohr Institute at the University of Copenhagen have now conducted experiments that raise doubts about this well-established model of electrical impulses along the nerve pathway.

“According to the theory of this ion mechanism, the electrical signal leaves an inactive region in its wake, and the nerve can only support new signals after a short recovery period of inactivity. Therefore, two electrical impulses sent from opposite ends of the nerve should be stopped after colliding and running into these inactive regions,” explains Thomas Heimburg, Professor and head of the Membrane Biophysics Group at the Niels Bohr Institute at the University of Copenhagen.

Thomas Heimburg and his research group conducted experiment in the laboratory using nerves from earthworms and lobsters. The nerves were removed and used in an experiment which allowed the researchers to stimulate the nerve fibres with electrodes on both ends. Then they measured the signals en route. 

“Our study showed that the signals passed through each other completely unhindered and unaltered. That’s how sound waves work. A sound wave doesn’t stop when it meets another sound wave. Both waves continue on unimpeded. The nerve impulse can therefore be explained by the fact that the pulse is a mechanical wave in the form of a sound pulse, a soliton, that moves along the nerve membrane,” explains Thomas Heimburg.

The theory is confirmed

When the sound pulse moves through the nerve pathway, the membrane changes locally from a liquid to a more solid form. The membrane is compressed slightly, and this change leads to an electrical pulse as a consequence of the piezoelectric effect.

“The electrical signal is thus not based on an electric current but is caused by a mechanical force,” points out Thomas Heimburg.

Thomas Heimburg, along with Professor Andrew Jackson, first proposed the theory that nerves function by sound pulses in 2005. Their research has since provided support for this theory, and the new experiments offer additional confirmation for the theory that nerve signals are sound pulses.

Huh! Awesome!

Reblogged from Neuroscience
ktt:

Lunar Fruit by J.P Ormiston

I like that it’s a blood orange

ktt:

Lunar Fruit by J.P Ormiston

I like that it’s a blood orange

Reblogged from ?‽!
Reblogged from Neil Cicierega Tumblr.
morebadbookcovers:

professor-pigeon:

This is the actual cover of an actual book in an actual library and it has changed my life forever

Computer animation: no, but it REALLY sucks.

morebadbookcovers:

professor-pigeon:

This is the actual cover of an actual book in an actual library and it has changed my life forever

Computer animation: no, but it REALLY sucks.

Reblogged from Bad Book Covers
Dane Martin

Dane Martin

Reblogged from Dane Martin
Dane Martin

Dane Martin

Reblogged from Dane Martin